Hurricanes and Cyclones 2020

Climate changing due to the Sun and not carbon dioxide: Sea and Surface Temperatures, Major Earthquakes, Volcano Eruptions, Droughts, Extreme Temperatures, Famine, Flooding, Wildfires and Cyclones suddenly intensified in the late 50s!
Weather changes constantly, scientists tell us our climate changes in repeated cycles and these changes can provide big changes for people living on earth. There is no doubt, our climate is changing, it's getting warmer, it's also getting colder and wetter in many places and dryer in others but is it man causing climate change or is it something else?
Around 200 BC and 600 AD, there was Roman warming. Around AD 440 and 900, Dark Ages cooling. Around 900 to 1300, we had Medieval warming. Followed by "The Little Ice-Age," 1300 to 1850, phases 1 and 2. Around 1850 to present is the modern warming.

Tropical Cyclone Uesi to strengthen as it heads to the Vanuatu Islands and could potentially make an Australian landfall near Brisbane at the end of the week
The still image above was captured by the NOAA-20 satellite's VIIRS instrument, which scans the entire Earth twice per day at a 750-meter resolution.

Winds close to the centre of Tropical Cyclone Uesi are estimated at 125KM/HR. according to the Vanuatu Met office. In the past 12 hours, the system has moved in a south southeasterly direction at a speed of 12KM/HR. The potential for the system to recurve and move towards Vanuatu is low. Seas will remain very rough with heavy to phenomenal swells over coastal and open waters to the west of the Vanuatu group. Severe weather warning for heavy rainfalls for northern, central and southern provinces, while Marine strong wind warning for all coastal waters are current.

Here come the storms! Tropical Cyclone Blake the 1st cyclone of the Australian season: Expected to reach category 2 strength by Tuesday: System 92S also forming in the Arafura Sea
Tropical Cyclone Blake is the 1st cyclone of the Australian season and is expected to reach category 2 strength by Tuesday. Blake is located 121 nautical miles north of Broom on the northwestern coast of Australia and is moving slowly southeastwards. Flood watches are in place with 250 mm rain expected in some parts. Destructive gale-force winds are expected later today. According to the latest update from BOM Tropical Cyclone Blake continues to develop to the north of Broome and is likely to track close to the Dampier Peninsula. Gales and heavy rain likely over the northwest Kimberley coast.



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