Volcano Eruptions 2020



It's exciting, it's an old friend and it's the highest active volcano in Eurasia! The latest eruption of the Klyuchevskaya Sopka volcano in Russia's Kamchatka spews ash 7,000m into the skies
It's exciting, it's an old friend and it's the highest active volcano in Eurasia!

The eruption of the Klyuchevskaya Sopka volcano in Russia's Kamchatka has created spectacular scenes, producing rivers of lava and massive smoke clouds – but scientists worry that the resulting ash cloud could disrupt air traffic. The latest activity within the steep symmetrical cone of the volcano – the highest in Eurasia – blew ash some 7,000 meters into the air on Monday, the Emergencies Ministry said. Klyuchevskaya Sopka, at 4,649 meters in height, was effectively inactive for three years before it started spewing lava again last October – and the smouldering eruption has continued to some degree ever since.

Indonesia's most active volcano Mount Merapi erupted Friday, shooting a column of ash some 5,000 metres (16,000 feet) into the air in its second major eruption this month.
Indonesia's most active volcano Mount Merapi erupted Friday, shooting a column of ash some 5,000 metres (16,000 feet) into the air in its second major eruption this month.

Ash and sand-covered areas several kilometres (miles) away from the peak of the rumbling crater near Indonesia's cultural capital Yogyakarta. But authorities did not raise Merapi's alert level.

"There have been no reports of damage from the eruption. We urge people to stay calm and not panic," national disaster mitigation agency spokesman Agus Wibowo said.

Merapi erupted earlier this month, shooting a massive ash cloud some 6,000 metres in the air. That eruption coated Yogyakarta and neighbouring city Solo with grey dust and forced an airport closure.  

Mount Merapi's last major eruption in 2010 killed more than 300 people and forced the evacuation of 280,000 residents. That was Merapi's most powerful eruption since 1930, which killed around 1,300 people, while another explosion in 1994 took about 60 lives.


March uptick in volcanic activity continues: Mount Semeru in Lumajang, East Java, spews hot clouds and ash 3km into the Indonesian sky just 2 days after the eruption of Mount Merapi
Mount Semeru in Lumajang, East Java, has started spewing hot clouds as high as 3km, the Malang Disaster and Mitigation Agency (BPBD) reported, issuing a level II (advisory) warning status for the volcano. The agency observed that the hot clouds had an amplitude of 23mm and was accompanied by a 540-second earthquake. BPBD Malang head Subagyo said that it was a normal, natural occurrence and that the situation was under control. However, the Malang agency as well as the Center of Volcanology and Geological Hazards Mitigation both advise the public to remain at a distance of 1-4km from the south and southeastern edges of Semeru’s active crater. — The Jakarta Post/ANN

BOOM! Indonesia's most active volcano erupted Tuesday, spewing sand and pyroclastic material, sending massive smoke-and-ash column 6,000 meters (19,680 feet) high into the sky.
Indonesia's most active volcano erupted Tuesday, spewing sand and pyroclastic material, sending massive smoke-and-ash column as high as 6,000 meters (19,680 feet) into the sky. The eruption of Mount Merapi on the main island of Java also unleashed searing gas clouds 2 kilometres (1.2 miles) down its slopes, said Indonesia's Geology and Volcanology Research Agency on its website. The agency said villagers living on Merapi's fertile slopes are advised to stay 3 kilometres (1.8 miles) from the crater's mouth as the ash made the rain thick and muddy in several villages.
Witnesses said the sound was heard 30 kilometres (18 miles) away. The agency did not raise the alert status of Merapi, which already was at the third-highest level due to its ongoing activity. The 2,968-meter (9,737-foot) mountain is the most active of 500 Indonesian volcanoes.

Climate changing due to the Sun and not carbon dioxide: Sea and Surface Temperatures, Major Earthquakes, Volcano Eruptions, Droughts, Extreme Temperatures, Famine, Flooding, Wildfires and Cyclones suddenly intensified in the late 50s!
Weather changes constantly, scientists tell us our climate changes in repeated cycles and these changes can provide big changes for people living on earth. There is no doubt, our climate is changing, it's getting warmer, it's also getting colder and wetter in many places and dryer in others but is it man causing climate change or is it something else?

Around 200 BC and 600 AD, there was Roman warming. Around AD 440 and 900, Dark Ages cooling. Around 900 to 1300, we had Medieval warming. Followed by "The Little Ice-Age," 1300 to 1850, phases 1 and 2. Around 1850 to present is the modern warming.

The first volcanic eruption of February belongs to Japan: No injuries reported after volcano erupts on Kuchinoerabu Island in Kagoshima Prefecture
A volcano on an island in Kagoshima Prefecture erupted early Monday, the Meteorological Agency said, with no immediate reports of injuries. Pyroclastic flows observed there for the first time since Jan. 29 last year reached around 900 meters southwest of the crater, while ash and smoke rose to an altitude of some 7,000 meters after the 5:30 a.m. eruption of Mount Shindake on Kuchinoerabu Island, according to the agency.
Rocks were thrown around 600 meters from the crater. The agency maintained the current alert level of 3 on its scale of 5, which advises climbers not to scale the mountain. The alert was raised from level 2 in October following a major earthquake. 

There she blows (again): The Mexican monster Popocatépetl Volcano, whose name is the Aztec word for smoking mountain erupts again for the second time this month!
One of Mexico's most active volcanoes erupted in a dramatic nighttime show. The mountain is officially called Popocatepetl, but commonly referred to as "El Popo." On Monday night it shot huge clouds of smoke and ash into the sky. Witnesses say the columns rose some 2,000 feet above the crater. Mexican Civil Defense issued a volcanic alert, warning people to stay away from the volcano and its foothills. So far there have been no reports of damage or injury associated with the eruption. 
It's not the first time the Mexican monster has erupted this month, on Thursday the 9th of January 2020 the Popocatépetl Volcano, whose name is the Aztec word for smoking mountain and towers to 5426 m 70 km SE of Mexico City to form North America's 2nd-highest volcano spewed a volcanic ash plume that rose up to an estimated 3,000m (9,800ft) into the Mexico sky.

There She Blows! (Again) Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska, kicked out a plume of ash as high as 28,000 feet (8,535 m) above sea level (For the second time this month!)
An Alaska volcano that has been rumbling since midsummer shot ash about 5 miles (8 km) into the sky on Sunday, triggering a warning to aviators and dusting one small fishing village, officials reported. The volcano is on Unimak Island, the largest island on the Aleutian chain, 120 miles northeast of Unalaska Island. It’s about 700 miles west of Anchorage.
Shishaldin Volcano, one of the most active in Alaska, kicked out a plume of ash that satellite imagery detected as high as 28,000 feet (8,535 m) above sea level, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the joint federal-state-university office that tracks the state’s many volcanoes. 

Taal Volcano Update No 4: A larger eruption, which is increasingly expected, could conveniently cool the global climate and cause "A Year Without Summer."
Philippine officials said Saturday they're bracing for a long crisis whether the Taal volcano erupts more disastrously or simmers precariously for weeks or months, as massive numbers of displaced villagers languish in emergency shelters. Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said more than 900 villagers who fell ill have been treated, mostly for exposure to volcanic ash, in evacuation sites since the volcano began erupting in Batangas province near Manila, the capital, last weekend. About 125,000 people fled from ash-blanketed villages and crammed into hundreds of emergency centres in Batangas alone and many others took shelter in relatives' homes, disaster-response officials said, appealing for masks, bottled water, portable toilets, food and sleeping mats.

Europe’s largest colossus, the Mount Etna volcano, is spewing lava again after a number of explosions signalled an increase in volcanic activity (Spectacular Video)
YouTube

Europe’s largest volcano, Mount Etna, is spewing lava again after a number of explosions signalled an increase in volcanic activity. The explosions have taken place in different crates over a couple of days, sending rocks flying through the air and creating lava flows. Etna is also the largest of Italy’s three active volcanoes, alongside Mount Vesuvius and Stromboli.


Taal Volcano Update No 3: Two people have been killed and the number of evacuees reached almost 100,000 after the eruption of the Taal volcano in the Philippines: Existing fissures widening
Two people have been killed and the number of evacuees reached almost 100,000, after the eruption of the Taal volcano in the Philippines. People living within 14 km of the volcano have left their homes for security reasons, local authorities said. Despite the risk, many citizens refuse to evacuate and have returned to their homes. For this reason, police and military are mobilized to move them out of the danger area. The Volcanology Science Institute of the Philippines has warned that Taal can erupt at any moment, pile up ash and lava flows and tear off nearby settlements. After its eruption on January 12, a large number of flights to and from Manila airport were cancelled. Taal, the world's smallest volcano, is one of the 10 active in the Philippines.

Taal Volcano Update: Almost 500,000 told to leave the area, another 30,000 were evacuated after Sunday's eruption: Experts are worried a much larger eruption is just around the corner
The latest eruption at the Taal Volcano in the Philippines could well be just a fore-show of bigger things to come. Experts are worried a much larger eruption is just around the corner. Yesterday almost 500,000 people were told to leave the area, another 30,000 were evacuated after Sunday's eruption which blasted ash almost 10 miles, (16 km) into the Philippines sky coating everything in ash for miles around.

Taal Volcano’s eruption has been characterized by continuous magmatic and hydrovolcanic activity. Lava fountains generated 800-meter tall dark grey steam-laden plumes that drifted to the general southwest.

Taal volcano Philippines: Eruption intensifies: Lava spews as 'hazardous eruption' feared: Concerns of a Volcanic tsunami: 144 earthquakes recorded in last 24 hours
Screengrab showing eruption generating a spectacular electric storm, the video can be seen below. 
Taal volcano: Eruption intensifies: Lava spews as 'hazardous eruption' fearedEruption intensifies leaving officials concerned of a Volcanic tsunami. The Philippine Seismic Network has recorded a total of one hundred forty-four (144) volcanic earthquakes in the Taal region since 1:00 PM, January 12, 2020. Eruption causing its own electric storm   
A new bulletin has been issued by the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) over the eruption of the Taal Volcano. 

Another one blows! 2020's incredible seismic and volcanic activity continues: The Taal volcano, south of the Philippines capital Manila, emitted an ash plume about 1km (0.6 miles) into the sky.
A volcano in the Philippines has emitted a giant plume of ash, prompting authorities to order the evacuation of some 8,000 people living nearby. The plume coming from the Taal volcano, south of the capital Manila, stretched about 1km (0.6 miles) into the sky.
Rumbling sounds and tremors were also reported around Taal - the Philippines' second-most active volcano - on Sunday. Local authorities have issued an evacuation order as the Taal volcano shows signs of an impending eruption. Taal has not erupted in decades, but one catastrophic event in 1911 killed over 1,000 people. Thousands of people were being evacuated south of the Philippine capital of Manila on Sunday as the Taal Volcano began to send clouds of ash and stone into the sky.

Mexico's colossus Popocatépetl volcano spews cloud of ash and rocks 3,000m (9,800ft) into the sky (Video)

The Mexican colossus, the Popocatépetl Volcano, whose name is the Aztec word for smoking mountain and towers to 5426 m 70 km SE of Mexico City to form North America's 2nd-highest volcano is currently spewing a volcanic ash plume that rose up to an estimated 3,000m (9,800ft) into the Mexico sky.

Mexico's Popocatépetl volcano erupted on Thursday with a dramatic show of lava and a cloud of ash and rocks that reached 3,000m (9,800ft) into the sky. No-one was hurt. Popocatépetl is an active stratovolcano, 70km (43 miles) south-east of the capital, Mexico City. Its name means "smokey mountain" in the indigenous Náhuatl language.

Shishaldin Volcano Alaska's colossus shot a cloud of ash more than 5 miles high for the second time this week and raining volcanic particles onto a nearby community
An Alaska volcano shot an ash cloud about 5 miles (8 km) into the sky on Tuesday, prompting flight delays and cancellations and raining volcanic particles onto at least one nearby community, officials said. It is the volcanoes second eruption this week. Last Friday Alaska's colossus shot a cloud of ash more than 5 miles high. Shishaldin Volcano is one of Alaska’s most active volcanoes, a towering ice-covered cone in the Aleutian Islands.
The ash-producing explosion at Shishaldin Volcano, about 680 miles (1,094 km) southwest of Anchorage, marked the biggest event in about six months of the on-and-off eruption activity at the mountain, the Alaska Volcano Observatory reported. Shishaldin, one of Alaska’s most active volcanoes and the highest peak in the Aleutian Islands chain, began emitting ash Tuesday morning and was continuing to do so through early afternoon, observatory geologist Kristi Wallace said. 

The first volcano eruption of 2020 belongs to Alaska! Shishaldin Volcano Alaska's colossus shot a cloud of ash more than 5 miles high on Friday
A volcano in Alaska’s the Aleutian Islands began erupting Friday morning, with a pilot reporting an ash cloud estimated as high as 24,000 feet, officials say. Shishaldin Volcano, which erupted briefly last month, was sending up a cloud of volcanic ash that was moving southeast at 50 knots, the National Weather Service said.
Shishaldin Volcano one of Alaska’s most active volcanoes, a towering ice-covered cone in the Aleutian Islands, shot a cloud of ash more than 5 miles high on Friday, triggering a warning to aviators and putting on a show that was captured in satellite imagery. The ash burst from Shishaldin Volcano, about 670 miles southwest of Anchorage, was part of an on-and-off, mostly low-level series of eruptions that began in July with a stream of lava from the crater at the peak of the 9,373-foot-tall mountain.




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