SPACEWEATHER 2021

Credit NASA

What happened to mankind and our planet during and just after 1957 warrants a further and much deeper investigation. We saw how 1957 was a pivotal year for Earth and its inhabitants, although, we didn't realise it at the time. That year was, without a shadow of a doubt, the turning point for our planet and humanity, 1957 was probably the most important year in the history of mankind, why do I say that?
Because it appears to be the beginning of the end for our planet and mankind. The Sun's behaviour on Christmas Day, Boxing Day and during the previous twelve months of 1957 was in itself astonishing and Earth's seismic reaction with a record-busting total of major quakes in the same year is not a coincidence. 

A surprise and somewhat unexpected G1-class geomagnetic storm with solar wind reaching speeds of more than 600 km/s, see graph, is now beginning to subside after a stream of solar wind buffeted Earth's magnetosphere from a small coronal hole on our star last night.

According to Spaceweather.com, a stream of solar wind hit Earth on Jan. 25th. The impact sparked an unexpected G1-class geomagnetic storm. The solar wind was expected.

In 1957 our star produced by far the largest number of sunspots ever recorded in one year, no other year has ever come close, however, something else happened in 1957, our planet suddenly and unexpectedly produces the record total of major quakes, mag 6 or higher when a total of 204 were recorded.

Incredibly, something else coincided with the mass testing of nuclear bombs in the 50s, not realised at that time and not mentioned even now, surprisingly enough. During the Second World War, major earthquakes, (magnitude 6 or higher) began to dwindle to just 29 in the whole year of 1947, the lowest yearly total since the 27 recorded way back in 1921.

2 Jan 2021

Millions of tons of toxic particulates thrown into the atmosphere during the last 60 years

As 2020 disappears into the sunset, it closes the warmest decade (2011-2020) on record, according to the World Meteorological Organization. 2020 remains on track to be one of the three warmest on record, and may even rival 2016 as the warmest on record. The six warmest years have all been since 2015 and that is a fact even the most robust sceptic cannot ignore.

The exceptional heat of 2020 is despite a cooling La Niña event, which is now mature and impacting weather patterns in many parts of the world. 

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