Monday, 12 December 2016

BBC claim massive ice loss spreading up Antarctic glaciers! Just 3 weeks after NASA claim the Antarctic has been gaining 112 to 82 billion tons of ice a year since 1992.

Photo Watts Up With That? Antarctic is gaining billions of tons per year since last century


Proof of the left’s agenda on Global warming as left-wing media giants the BBC claim “massive Ice loss spreading up Antarctic glaciers!” When actually a three week old NASA report claims the Antarctic has been gaining 112 to 82 billion tons of ice a year since 1992.
They, the BBC, go on to say,  The scale and pace of change now taking place in West Antarctica is captured in a new, long-term satellite record.
Scientists have combined nearly a quarter of a century of observations to show how the region's great glaciers are losing height by up to 7 meters per year, more on this later.
Their unlikely story comes just three weeks after NASA claimed the Antarctic ice sheet showed a net gain of 112 billion tons of ice a year from 1992 to 2001, slowing to 82 billion tons of ice per year between 2003 and 2008.
The new NASA study says that an increase in Antarctic snow accumulation that began 10,000 years ago is currently adding enough ice to the continent to outweigh the increased losses from its thinning glaciers. The research challenges the conclusions of other studies, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) 2013 report, which says that Antarctica is overall losing land ice. According to the new analysis of satellite data, the Antarctic ice sheet showed a net gain of 112 billion tons of ice a year from 1992 to 2001. That net gain slowed to 82 billion tons of ice per year between 2003 and 2008. That is 112 to 82 billion tons a year GAIN NOT LOSS.
And in the same week Scott and Shackleton logbooks prove Antarctic sea ice is not shrinking 100 years after expeditions

You can see the BBC report here
The Telegraph reported this week that Antarctic sea ice has barely changed from where it was 100 years ago, scientists have discovered, after poring over the logbooks of great polar explorers such as Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton. Experts were concerned that ice at the South Pole had declined significantly since the 1950s, which they feared was driven by man-made climate change. But new analysis suggests that conditions are now virtually identical to when the Terra Nova and Endurance sailed to the continent in the early 1900s, indicating that declines are part of a natural cycle and not the result of global warming. It also explains why sea ice levels in the South Pole have begun to rise again in recent years, a trend which has left climate scientists scratching their heads.

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