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Wildfires 2021

As the Dixie fire in Butte County balloons in size, the Sugar fire burning in Plumas National Forest north of Sacramento has become the first 100,000-acre fire in California this year. The lightning-sparked Sugar fire ignited July 2 and quickly swelled in size as crews battled extreme temperatures and strong gusts of wind.

In the days that followed, spot fires and flareups made it difficult for firefighters to gain a footing on the blaze, officials said. At one point, it grew with such velocity that its massive cloud of smoke, ash, and heat generated its own lightning.

Extreme weather continues to wreak havoc across the planet with farmers, agriculture, wildlife, and humans all taking a hit on the chin from the unusually bad weather.

Unusual and unseasonal cold, record-breaking heat and droughts, wildfires, and killer floods are creating absolute havoc in the summer of 2021 as climate change becomes, "CLIMATE CHANGED!"

Unusual freezing temperatures and frost have harmed and damaged trees which will affect next year's coffee crops in many parts of Brazil. The country has suffered all year with drought and flooding and the cold snap is the final slap in the face for coffee producers.

It is early summer in the US and already Oregon is on the verge of suffering its biggest wildfire ever. The Bootleg Fire has been raging for two weeks and has become so intense it is creating its own weather, a phenomenon we have seen in California and Australia recently. So far the fire has ravaged nearly 400,000 acres and is approaching the biggest ever recorded wildfire in Oregon, which was the Long Haul Fire in 2012 which destroyed almost 560,000 acres. The fire is only 30% contained and has already destroyed an area the size of Los Angeles.

Upwards of nearly 100 wildfires are raging across 13 states in the US at this moment according to The National Interagency Fire Centre. The hot tinder-dry conditions will remain for the next two days with 3.5 million people under red flag warnings in the West for more wildfire outbreaks.

For years The Big Wobble has been warning people that extreme summer downpours and heatwaves would cause the places we call home, unliveable, for parts of the year at the very least.

More than 100 people have been killed and hundreds more missing in Germany, Belgium, and southern Holland after record amounts of rain have burst river banks in the areas but it was the speed of the rising water which caught many people unprepared. The UK was hit by a similar deluge at the beginning of this week and the government's advisory climate change committee told ministers the nation was even worse prepared for extreme weather events than it was five years ago, that's because these extreme events are increasing too rapidly for governments to react.

Many people who read my posts covering increasing heat on our planet often leave unhelpful comments such as, "well it's summer," or, "it's supposed to be hot!" These people, of course, are very funny if not observant, however, they often miss the word, "record," or the phrase, "hottest ever." What is happening to our planet's weather recently is astonishing.

California's Death Valley is known to be a hot place, I get that, but it hit 130 degrees Fahrenheit (54.4 degrees Celsius) Friday for only the fifth time in recorded history, that's only five days out of more than 40,000 days on record. The record for the number of consecutive days at 125 degrees or higher is 10, set in 1913 (June 28-July 5). This year, Death Valley hit 126 on July 7 and will likely continue that stretch of days with 125-plus temperatures through Tuesday. This would be eight straight days, which would be the second-longest streak in recorded history (tying eight days in 2013). 


Saturday, 10 July 2021 After hottest June ever, U.S. braces for new heatwave in the West: More drought, more record-breaking heatwaves, wildfires and early named storms on the cards for the US: Nation hit with more than 30 billion dollar disaster bill in just over six-months.

This large hailstone, being held with two hands, fell from a severe thunderstorm at approximately 7:35 pm CDT on April 28, 2021, near Hondo, Texas. NOAA’s NCEI verified that it's the largest hailstone on record to fall in Texas; it had a diameter of 6.416 inches and weighed 1.26 pounds. This severe weather outbreak across Oklahoma and Texas was one of eight separate billion-dollar disasters that struck the U.S during the first six months of 2021. (Resident submitted photo, courtesy of National Weather Service Forecast Office, San Antonio)

As June 2021 has just been announced as the hottest ever in the U.S. by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Tropical Storm Elsa was announced as the earliest 5th named storm in the Atlantic season ever, (typically the 5th named storm of a season usually arrives at about the end of August) the nation has been hit with a more than 30 billion-dollar disaster bill for 2021 in just over six-months.


Thursday, 17 June 2021 The crazy season is up and running ladies and gentlemen. After one of the coldest May's on record on both sides of the pond, the heatwaves and wildfires are back. the temperature in Death Valley, California, on Wednesday, was 126 degrees F, 52.22 deg C

The crazy season is up and running ladies and gentlemen. After one of the coldest May's on record on both sides of the pond, the heatwaves and wildfires are back. Massive wildfires are burning in Arizona, California, New Mexico, Utah and Montana. The last three summers have seen record-breaking wildfire seasons in the US with each season beginning earlier and ending later.

The Telegraph fire in southeastern Arizona is currently estimated at 165,740 acres.  This fast-moving, dynamic fire has prompted numerous evacuation status alerts.

The Pinnacle Fire, South of Phoenix is estimated at 15,801 acres. Fire weather conditions have been extreme, resulting in active fire behaviour. Night shift crews have been working through the night on improving constructed fire lines. The fire continues to grow due to the availability of fuels and rough terrain that limits safe access by ground forces. 


Wildfires 2019

Wildfires 2016/18

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