Wednesday, 11 January 2017

More marine life misery for Canada's East Coast as lobsters, connors, starfish and crab wash up dead along beaches of Norris Point,


Photo the Telegram
Yet another death of marine life mystery for the East Coast of Canada as lobsters, connors, starfish and crab are washing up dead along the beaches of Norris Point, NL, Canada.
DECKERS COVE, N.L. - Josephine Chubbs was shocked to see a large number of sea creatures wash up on the beach near her Norris Point home. Chubbs lives in an area known as Deckers Cove. “Our backyard is right on the ocean,” she said by phone Monday.
She estimates there were 100 lobsters alone. “It was babies, from two inches to measured (harvestable) lobsters.”
Chubbs, who is the custodian at the Bonne Bay Marine Station, was ready to do what she could to get the creatures to the tanks at the marine station, but everything was dead. “There was nothing that I could help save.”
She later called Bob Hooper; the retired MUN professor is the founding director of the station and still volunteers there, to get his thoughts on the discovery.
From the pictures she sent, Hooper was struck that there was a mixture of species, so he feels the creatures were not killed by a disease.
“Everything looked very healthy, apart from being dead,” he said.
He also noted that all the creatures washed up reach their northern limit in Newfoundland and are not things that are found in Labrador.
“The significance of that is it suggests that cold is the problem.”
He’s seen mortalities dozens of times between the fall and this time of year related to water temperatures getting close to and below freezing.
“Even it goes down a fraction of a degree it might make the difference between a connor being alive and a connor being dead.”
He said the loss is probably worse than it looked, as its possible more creatures than what washed up were affected, but hopes it’s localized to the shoal waters in front of Chubb’s house.

Something similar to this happened in Nova Scotia a few weeks ago as thousands of dead fish, starfish, crabs, clams, scallops and lobster washed up on the shore causing concern for public and scientists alike.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Oh sure, its not the fukushima radiation that's spewing into the ocean??? NAWWWW, its the water temperature... sure your right!!!

Rebecca MacDonald said...

Nova Scotia and Newfoundland are on Canada's east coast. These animals are in the Atlantic Ocean so probably not affected by Fukushima. But this is just about the time they predicted that the drift from the BP oil spill would reach this far north. And the die offs happened in Nova Scotia first (including a whale!) and then in Newfoundland further north after so this might be a potential cause. I hope I'm wrong since I'm on Prince Edward Island just to the left of these and because it would mean that the fish from both the west and east coasts might no longer be safe to fish or eat.

Wayne said...

IMHO: Actually No it is not. That's the Pacific Ocean for Fukushima. This is the gulf stream dragging up the toxic crap that was sprayed in the Gulf of Mexico that has finally moved up east coast i.e. Corexit 9500A and Corexit 9527A along with a lot more toxic chemicals. I have been tracking this up the eastern seaboard for years since spill. Its all the same the scientist play dumb or say natural occurrence. Not only does its kill marine life straight up it creates areas of no oxygen so these areas destroy all marine life on bottom and whatever is swimming in the dead zones.

DAvid said...

It seems that radiation from FUK U is entering eastern Canada through both rain/wind and through the artic. The big blob of radiactive material/heat seems to be sitting smack dab in Gulf of Alaska.

Another plausible scenario is the recent raiation from East Coast US power plants. They are very old. God's speed All

Cori Gunnells said...

See demonstration of ice nucleation here > http://www.geoengineeringwatch.org/climate-engineering-chemical-cool-down-continues/
Could this be endothermic ice nucleation chemical effects? ~ Cori
"“Everything looked very healthy, apart from being dead,” he said.
He also noted that all the creatures washed up reach their northern limit in Newfoundland and are not things that are found in Labrador.
“The significance of that is it suggests that cold is the problem.”
He’s seen mortalities dozens of times between the fall and this time of year related to water temperatures getting close to and below freezing.
“Even it goes down a fraction of a degree it might make the difference between a connor being alive and a connor being dead.” ~ Bob Hooper, retired MUN professor, founding director of Bonne Bay Marine Station.

Einstein Albert said...

Don't know why this is getting so much press now. This happens when we have a winter with no ice and we get a lot of onshore winds. Anything that gets caught in shallow water gets washed ashore.

D.A. Murphy said...

What is a connor?. Tried to look it up no dice.

Gary Walton said...

A crustation I think, not sure though

Nohan said...

Chances are it's this...look up and wake up

http://www.geoengineeringwatch.org/

Anonymous said...

Add Newport Quebec to the list. My mother's backyard was full of dead lobsters last week along the Gaspe Coast. We had a couple of big storms though.

Gary Walton said...

Wooah thanks for the tip off