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Monday, 6 July 2020

A suspected case of bubonic plague has been registered in China’s north, according to local health authorities and a further two more cases in neighbouring Mongolia.

Swollen inguinal lymph glands on a person infected with the bubonic plague Wikipedia

A suspected case of bubonic plague has been registered in China’s north, according to local health authorities and a further two more cases in neighbouring Mongolia.  It’s believed the patient in question is suffering from the bubonic form, which causes swollen lymph nodes, and is considered to be the most easily treated variant of the disease but can also kill a person in one day.

Cases of bubonic plague are periodically reported around the world. Madagascar saw more than 300 cases during an outbreak in 2017. In May last year, two people in the country of Mongolia died from the plague, which they contracted after eating the raw meat of a marmot - a type of rodent.

Madagascar
In November 2017 a total of 2119 confirmed, probable and suspected cases of plague, including more than 300 deaths were reported by the Ministry of Health of Madagascar to the World Health Organization, WHO. The island off the east coast of Africa is no stranger to the Bubonic Plague with small outbreaks every year, what was disturbing in 2017, however, was the fact most of the cases in the outbreak was the pneumonic plague, a more virulent form that spreads through coughing, sneezing, or spitting and is almost always fatal if untreated. For the 1st time, the disease long seen in the country's remote areas was largely concentrated in its 2 largest cities, Antananarivo and Toamasina which caused great concern.

As the outbreak of the plague in Madagascar continued to evolve at a pace an alarming development saw the disease arrive in Seychelles. Health officials in Seychelles confirmed that 3 people tested positive for the Bubonic Plague in November 2017.

Disease

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