Monday, 29 July 2019

"Something's going on up there!" Strange sunsets are being witnessed around the world as the Arctic burns: "Worst Arctic wildfires in 10,000 years!"

Photo credit: Heiko Ulbricht of Saxony, Germany

"Burn baby burn-when we gonna learn?"
Strange sunsets are being witnessed around the world as the Arctic burns.
The sweltering Arctic is ablaze, wildfires are ravaging the Arctic, with areas of northern Siberia, northern Scandinavia, Alaska and Greenland engulfed in flames.
Vast areas of Alaska Greenland and Siberia are literally on fire with Alaska alone burning 1.6 billion acres this year.
Right now in Siberia alone, more than 2 million hectares are ablaze, making it one of the worst Arctic wildfires in 10,000 years.

According to Spaceweather.com, Is it any coincidence that skywatchers around the world are witnessing strange sunsets?
"We have been seeing extreme twilight colours near the German-Czech border," reports Heiko Ulbricht of Saxony, Germany Ulbricht who took the picture above on July 27th from the Zittau Mountains in southeastern Germany.

"Curtains of dust in the atmosphere formed rippling lines and waves similar to those we have seen this summer in noctilucent clouds," says Ulbricht.
"Shortly after sunset, an extreme purple light appeared as well."
Far away in Joshua Tree, California, veteran observer Don Davis saw them, too.
"They reminded me of volcanic sunsets I saw in 1991 following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo," he says.
Davis's photos show the same purple hue and streaky textures that Ulbricht witnessed in Germany.
Photo credit: Heiko Ulbricht of Saxony, Germany

"The glow and cloud structures look stratospheric," notes atmospheric optics expert Les Cowley, "but I'm not aware of any data confirming that smoke from the wildfires has made it so high in the atmosphere." Something's going on up there.
Aerosols from Arctic wildfires are a chief suspect, but we cannot rule out the fumes of several active volcanoes.
Skywatchers around the world are encouraged to be alert for strange sunsets.

Spaceweather

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