Monday, 8 January 2018

Thousands of bats drop dead from trees after temperatures topped 47 degrees C around Sydney where heat is so severe it has melted tarmac

Photo Northern Star
Thousands of flying foxes, bats, died in an Australian heatwave so severe it has melted tarmac.
Animal welfare volunteers battled to save the lives of the hundreds of babies and some adults in distress but the death toll is believed to be in the thousands.
A spokesman from the charity Help Save the Wildlife and Bushlands in Campbelltown said: "The efforts of our volunteers yesterday was both heroic and heartbreaking.
"In extremely trying conditions they worked tirelessly to provide sub-cutaneous fluids to the pups that could be reached and many lives were saved.
"But sadly many lives were lost too.
"Hundreds of mainly young flying-foxes were lost to the heat yesterday and the final count could run to thousands."
The heatwave in three states brought temperatures strong enough to melt the bitumen on a highway and sparked bushfires that destroyed buildings and threatened lives.
A fire raging out of control set several structures ablaze on the outskirts of Melbourne, the country's second largest city, and the capital of the southeastern state of Victoria as a result of the heatwave. The state's emergency management commissioner, Craig Lapsley, said hot temperatures had combined with dry weather, strong winds and a wind change to create dangerous conditions.
"It's exactly what the forecast indicated and when we have fires running that's obviously a problem for us," he told a news conference.
About 400 homes lost power and 50 fires were reported across Victoria on Saturday, although many were small and were extinguished.
Emergency warnings were issued both in Victoria and in the nearby state of South Australia, where authorities advised residents of a rural area to seek shelter in buildings from an out-of-control fire.
Yesterday an international tennis competition was cancelled because of the heat after players and fans fainted from the heat during the Australian open in a simillar heatwave back in 2016.

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