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Tuesday, 20 October 2020

CRISPR and a brave new world: CRISPR represents a new frontier in gene editing; in comparison to other currently available technologies, it is a less expensive, more specific and simpler-to-use gene-editing tool and could introduce "the mark of the beast."

The Number Of The Beast. William Blake.

CRISPR and a brave new world.

What Is CRISPR?

The CRISPR technology works by coding for a specific gene sequence using guide RNA. When the appropriate DNA sequence is found, the Cas9 protein, working as a pair of scissors, cuts the DNA at the desired location. Once the cut has been made, the gene can be disabled, or missing genetic information can be inserted or replaced. Due to its characteristics, CRISPR represents a new frontier in gene editing; in comparison to other currently available technologies, it is a less expensive, more specific and simpler-to-use gene-editing tool.

A Brave New World.

After watching several documentaries recently regarding the ethics of the CRISPR, Gene Editing Technology I was brought face to face again with the wonderful skilful advance and achievements of science and medication by our scientists outweighed by the horrors of opportunity from our military, leaders, politicians and institutions.

No one, I believe does not want to see the little blind kid not have his site repaired, or the young girl having her impaired hearing fixed. But where do we draw the line? CRISPR, after all, is human and animal geoengineering. CRISPR gives the guy on the street the ability to change a person's DNA without spending millions of Dollars.

The first great ethical question here is this; if we do change someone's DNA do they remain human? Of course, they still look human and they probably act human, hopefully, but they have been edited whether by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying there actual DNA, they have been changed. 

Secondly, who is to say this tweak will not come back and bite the person who changed his DNA, someway down the line in the future? No one knows at this stage of its development.

But by far the most frightening intimidating scenario of all. What if the dark forces of our military, government and our leaders decide they can use it on us, the people, to control us, to keep us under tabs?

Here is one scenario which would have most of the world queuing up to have the CRISPR, DNA Changing Gene Editing Technology.

Imagine, the UN, for example, along with the WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION offered the world a cure for Covid-19, along with a "medical upgrade" for themselves, guaranteeing the patient an extra "50 years of disease-free life" by having their DNA tweaked and having a chip inserted which would track-and-trace and at the same time introduce the world to a cashless society and all this free of charge!

In one clean sweep, hey-presto, we have "the mark of the beast," mentioned in the Bible and people would only be able to buy and sell if they had the mark of the beast. It would be so easy folks. Who wouldn't want to be rid of Covid-19 now? And who wouldn't want 50 years extra, disease-free living?

A done bun that can't be undone. Once you have that mark, once you have the little DNA tweak you have condemned yourself forever, condemned yourself for just 50 measly disease-free years when you could have had eternal life!

Just as the days of Noah folks.

The Potential That CRISPR Offers for COVID-19

COVID-19 and the Ebola epidemic in the mid-2010s illustrated the lengthy time lag of developing preventative therapies. CRISPR technology has the potential to overcome this challenge by significantly accelerating the development of vaccines or therapeutic options to respond to pandemics. This is because CRISPR technology is based on a naturally occurring gene-editing system that is found in bacteria, which can be used to fight viruses.

Increased urbanization and contact between different world regions is likely to lead to an increase in the frequency of epidemics, and this new reality has spurred an increased interest in CRISPR as a means to quickly respond to disease outbreaks or even unpredictable seasonal infections. A quick response can help protect healthcare professionals in the short term, and embrace the promise of “prevention is better than treatment.”

Improved Manufacturing

There is a range of different applications for using CRISPR in the development of therapeutic solutions. Traditional vaccines typically consist of a weakened or dead strand of the virus that it is meant to inoculate patients from viruses. When developing a vaccine, the manufacturer must select viral strands, which are then either grown and incubated in hen eggs or cells. Full story

CRISPR (/ˈkrɪspər/) (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a family of DNA sequences found in the genomes of prokaryotic organisms such as bacteria and archaea. These sequences are derived from DNA fragments of bacteriophages that had previously infected the prokaryote. They are used to detect and destroy DNA from similar bacteriophages during subsequent infections. Hence these sequences play a key role in the antiviral (i.e. anti-phage) defence system of prokaryotes.

Diagram of the CRISPR prokaryotic antiviral defence mechanism

The CRISPR-Cas system is a prokaryotic immune system that confers resistance to foreign genetic elements such as those present within plasmids and phages and provides a form of acquired immunity. RNA harbouring the spacer sequence helps Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins recognize and cut foreign pathogenic DNA. Other RNA-guided Cas proteins cut foreign RNA. CRISPR is found in approximately 50% of sequenced bacterial genomes and nearly 90% of sequenced archaea.

These systems have created CRISPR gene editing that commonly utilizes the cas9 gene. This editing process has a wide variety of applications including basic biological research, development of biotechnology products, and treatment of diseases. The CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technique was a significant contributor to the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2020 being awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer DoudnaWikipedia

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Soon after the CRIPR sensation came onto the surface of the public's awareness, studies followed that proved that this isn't the 'exact' science as it's made to believe. Stuff gets messed up if you want to mess with nature and this happens again and again and again and also with CRISPR. It's just that the media outlets don't report on this as they are involved in the profits of pharma/biotech and not much more than the mouthpiece of the authoritarians and their propaganda.

Melly said...

Love is the word.