Monday, 23 January 2017

Record breaking waves and rainfall pound Northern California as the third and most powerful in a series of storms to hit commuters on Monday

Photo: Don Dianda

As a swell moved in from the west, big waves pounded the Northern California coast on Saturday.
The National Weather Service (NOAA) buoys recorded waves from 20 to 30-plus feet between Cape San Martin to the south and Point Arena to the north.
Monterey Bay recorded the largest waves it has seen in 30 years with the swell reaching 34.12 feet, well over 10 meters, at one point. The previous record was 32.8 feet in 2008.
The third and most powerful in a series of storms pounded Southern California, dropping nearly 4 inches of rain south of Los Angeles, flooding freeways and raising concerns about damaging mudslides.


Photo: Don Dianda
Commuters could expect a messy drive to work Monday in several areas, with rainfall expected to ease slightly but not taper off until Tuesday.
Flash flood watches and warnings were in effect for swaths of greater Los Angeles and across Southern California where multiple roads were closed Sunday or blocked by fallen trees.
The National Weather Service cautioned that the system was expected to gain strength into Sunday evening and could end up being the strongest storm in at least seven years. California has been swamped during a wet winter that has brought plenty of rain and snow after years of drought.

By early evening, the rainfall had set new records. Long Beach Airport received 3.87 inches of rain by 5 p.m., breaking the all-time daily record for rainfall. Los Angeles Airport got 2.78 inches of rain Sunday, another all-time daily record.

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