Saturday, 30 January 2016

It's now thought to be more than 300.000 dead common murres the largest murre die-off ever recorded and it's just the tip of a very large iceberg


Photo fukushimaupdate.yolasite.com
The mass of dead seabirds that have washed up on Alaska beaches in past months is unprecedented in size, scope and duration, a federal biologist said at an Anchorage science conference.
The staggering die-off of common murres, the iconic Pacific seabirds sometimes likened to flying penguins, is a signal that something is awry in the Gulf of Alaska, said Heather Renner, supervisory wildlife biologist at the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge.
"We are in the midst of perhaps the largest murre die-off ever recorded," Renner told the Alaska Marine Science Symposium on Thursday.
While there have been big die-offs of murres and other seabirds in the past, recorded since the 1800s, this one dwarfs all of them, Renner said.
"This event is almost certainly larger than the murres killed in the Exxon Valdez oil spill," she said. After that spill -- at the time, the nation's largest -- about 22,000 dead murres were recovered by crews conducting extensive beach searches in the four months after the tanker grounding, according to the Exxon Valdez Trustee Council, the federal-state panel that administers funds paid to settle spill-related claims for natural-resource damages.
Now, hundreds and thousands of dead murres are turning up on a wide variety of Alaska beaches, including nearly 8,000 discovered this month on a mile-long stretch in Whittier, she said.
A preliminary survey in Prince William Sound has already turned up more than 22,000 dead murres there, she said.
Starving, dying and dead murres are showing up far from their marine habitat, in inland places as distant as Fairbanks, hundreds of miles from the Gulf of Alaska coast, making the die-off exceptionally large in geographic scale.
Even if she weren't an expert, the bird die-off would be obvious to Renner.
She lives in Homer, where the beaches are "littered" with murre carcasses, she said.
"You can't walk more than a few feet without finding murres," she said.
Since only a small proportion of those killed ever show up as carcasses on the shore -- past studies put that proportion at 15 percent -- the actual death toll is likely much higher, (300.000) emphasis by The Big Wobble.
The murre die-off began last spring, making it an especially long-lasting event. And would probably rule out El-Nino as the cause.
It coincides with widespread deaths of other marine animals, from whales in the Gulf of Alaska to sea lions in California.
Once again an "expert" gives only a small percentage of what is really happening.....
The above is of course only a small part of a west coast echo system which appears to be on melt down with Whales, fur seals, sea otters, walrus, dolphins, birds, fish, mussels and starfish, all dying in catastrophic numbers along the coast from Mexico to Alaska for almost four years now and it's getting worse.
The die-off is overwhelmingly affecting common murres rather than thick-billed murres, which are closely related but tend to use slightly more western and northwestern waters from the Aleutians to the Chukchi Sea.
The immediate cause of the bird deaths is starvation.
Which once again is probably true but why are they starving and the simple answer to that question is.. "there is no food in the ocean, where on earth did it go?"
Why is Fukushima never mentioned?
It's never even mentioned, not even in denial........Never!
Which is strange, you would expect the experts to be falling over themselves to deny Fukushima is involved but they don't, their silence is deafening.
In December 2015 a government funded scientific team, The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution released a report showing higher levels of Cesium-134, the so called finger of Fukushima had been detected off the US west coast.
Scientists monitoring the spread of radiation coming across the Pacific to the west coast of the US from the stricken nuclear plant Fukushima have reported finding increased levels of radiation along the coast from Alaska, Canada and all the way down to southern California.
This includes the highest detected level to date from a sample collected about 1,600 miles west of San Francisco.
The level of radioactive cesium isotopes in the sample, 11 Becquerel’s per cubic meter of seawater (about 264 gallons), was found to be 50 percent higher than other samples collected along the West Coast so far.
below is a small compilation of reports of marine life around the world just this month alone....

Tens of thousands of dead fish as far as the eye can see on Martha's Vineyard is the latest catastrophic problem in the waters around The North American Continent!

Tens of thousands of starfish wash up in the Gulf of Mexico: Experts at a loss for the carnage!

More sperm whales wash up dead just a couple of hundred miles away from the Dutch coast where last week 13 sperm whales died

300 dead turtles found on a beach in Odisha, India: Locals astonished by sheer number!

More whale deaths along the west coast! 7 dead whales found on coast of Baja California Sur: Malnutrition blamed by experts

The 13 dead sperm whales off the Dutch and German coast this week were perfectly healthy and not starving as first reported...250 years since so many whales died off the Dutch coast!

12 beached sperm whales die in week of carnage on Dutch and German coast

At least 45 whales died after a group of 81 washed ashore in Tamil Nadu India: Underwater disturbance... earthquake or volcano thought responsible.

70% of our sea birds and 75% of the worlds fish are now depleted: No fish left in our oceans by the year 2048 NOAA: Carnage along the west coast exploding since 2011

Alaskan bird die off update: "The number is totally off the charts!" Nearly 10,000 dead murres on a 1-mile stretch of beach along with hundreds of dead star fish...Lack of food blamed

The death of more than 100,000 common murres on the west coast of America blamed on El-Nino even though die off reports started last April!

It could be tens of thousands.....Nearly 10,000 common murres found dead on an Alaskan beach on the first week of 2016

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